Wine of the Week [April 22-28]

Greetings fellow wine enthusiasts!  Regardless of the degree to which you identify with the term, whether you like to enjoy a glass every now and then, or, like me, have considered naming your children after obscure Italian grape varietals like Marzemino and Schioppettino, we here at The Goat would like to foster your love for the drink by offering two wines per week that we will showcase here in the blog, and have available for tasting on Fridays from 6~7 p.m.

This week we’ll be addressing the resplendent, though oft-reproached, wine of Riesling.  Riesling is a grape varietal grown the world over, from steeply pitched vineyards along the Rhine River in Germany, to the vast plains of Western Victoria in Australia.  For many people the expectation from a glass of Riesling is simple and sweet.  This is very understandable, as the majority of what most people in America see fits that description.  This is probably the one wine misconception that motivates me most to tilt a bottle and blow some minds, because the spectrum of styles for Riesling is as broad as that of visible light! (Slight exaggeration)  Still, sparkling, aged, bone dry and insta-diabetes inducingly sweet, versions of Riesling can be found in abundance with a level of quality, range of flavors, and price to match absolutely any situation.  Allow me to be your spiritual guide into the magical realm of fantastical wonder that is Riesling!

Given the fact that I could talk to you for hours (this blog post is already too long…) about Riesling, and out of respect for the sanity of those of you who are interested I have selected two bottles just to crack the perverbial can of worms.

Monchhof’s Estate Riesling is an off-dry (slightly sweet) white, with softer white peach and pear notes; perfect with the milder weather! $7 gls

 

 

 

 

 

 

Immich-Batterieberg’s C.A.I. Riesling is strong, dry (not sweet), and elegant, with a more pronounced floral character, gooseberry and lime zest to compliment the lively acidity! $8 gls